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consequences for driving drunk

Have a Safe Thanksgiving This Year: Don’t Drink And Drive

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The holiday season is officially here, and many people are getting ready to have some fun at family parties. Everyone celebrates in their own special way, but many celebrations will be including alcohol. If that is the case, then a person should be prepared to get home safely that evening.

Thanksgiving is all about having a nice big dinner with family and being grateful for another year together. Since it’s a dinner celebration, there will likely be a bit of alcohol consumed. If that does happen, the person needs to have a safe ride home since, as everyone knows, driving with alcohol in your system is dangerous and illegal.

In order to avoid getting pulled over, best case scenario, or getting into an accident, worst case scenario, a person should have a designated driver. This can be a loved one who has not had any alcohol, or it can be a hired driver. That is the great thing about today’s modern world, it is so easy to get a taxi, Uber, or Lyft to take a person home. Often times, it can be done through an app on the person’s phone.

Drinking and driving is very dangerous, and results in dozens of deaths every single day in the United States. It is estimated that a person is killed in a drunk driving related accident every 50 minutes. This is a statistic that no one wants to be a part of. Luckily, that can easily be avoided by drinking responsibly, and having a designated driver.

When a person has an assigned designated driver to get them home, they do not have to worry about how much alcohol they are consuming at Thanksgiving this year. All they really have to worry about is not giving the rest of the family another embarrassing story to talk about for years to come.

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Who is Legally Responsible for a Drunk Driver

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Bar and restaurant owners already know that if one of their patrons leaves their establishment and injures someone in drunk driving accident, the owner could be facing serious financial repercussions in the form of a lawsuit. The idea is that the bar owner shouldn’t have over served the driver, and once they did, they should have taken the keys away.

Lately, many people have stated that the friends of people who turn into drunk drivers should also be responsible for the drunk driving accident, and therefore face financial and legal repercussions. The idea has gained a great deal of footing in Pennsylvania following a fatal drunk driving accident.

In the aftermath of the crash, many brought up the point that the drunk driver had passengers in his car and that these passengers knew that he was drunk. Many believe that while the passengers might not have been able to stop the drunk driver from getting behind the wheel, but they should have contacted the police, alerting them to the situation.


The concept is based on “Duty to Rescue” laws. These laws deal with the idea that if a person sees another person who is in danger, they should do whatever they can to help out. Failure to do so can result in legal action.


The simple truth is that it’s rare for no one to know that a person is too drunk to drive. Most people will even argue with the driver, trying to convince them to turn over their keys and sleep it off. When the driver refuses to hand the keys over, the bystanders usually simply hope that nothing bad happens. But should they be calling the police? Should they get into their own car, following the drunk driver, alerting the police to the driver’s exact location? Not only would this make it easier for the police to get the driver off the road but would also mean that someone else was on the scene if there was an accident.

The issue is a tricky one. While it’s one thing to say that someone has a moral obligation to report a drunk driver, it’s another to make it a law. The first problem is knowing how far to take the law. To be responsible, do you have to have a relationship with the drunk driver or is it enough to have simply been in the same bar as them? If they are in an accident, can the injured party’s insurance and loved ones go after you with the ferocity that they go after the driver? Or, what if you knew the driver was too drunk to get behind the wheel, but the slip out of the bar before while you’re in the bathroom and you don’t know what they drive or which direction they’re heading in? And what if you were drinking? That would mean your own judgement’s impaired, making it difficult to know just how drunk someone else is.

While there aren’t any laws on the books dealing with the topic of allowing someone else to drive drunk, it’s likely that this topic will be discussed a great deal in the upcoming years. The best way to make sure you don’t find yourself in legal trouble over the matter is by reporting drunk drivers, even if they’re a friend or family member.

Do You Hate DUI Checkpoints? Here’s Why You Shouldn’t

Do You Hate DUI Checkpoints? Here’s Why You Shouldn’t

Do You Hate DUI Checkpoints? Here’s Why You Shouldn’t

Whenever a holiday that involves a lot of drinking rolls around, you can bet that there will be an increase in DUI checkpoints. With Saint Patrick’s Day right around the corner, you will definitely be seeing more of these checkpoints.

Most people do not like DUI checkpoints, and for obvious reasons. Checkpoints like these slow the flow of traffic and can cause gridlock. When a person has somewhere they want to be, getting stuck at a checkpoint can be understandably frustrating. However, while DUI checkpoints can be annoying, the police officers create them for a reason.

Roughly 800 people are injured by drunk driving accidents every single day, and that is without the excuse of a holiday to start drinking. In an effort to reduce the amount of accidents that could occur around a holiday, local police setup DUI checkpoints to catch people who are driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Going through a checkpoint may be slow going, but it is incredibly easy if you have not been drinking. When you arrive at a checkpoint, an officer will wave you forward. The officer will then ask a few questions such as:

  • Where are you going?
  • Where are you coming from?
  • Have you been drinking?

After all of the questions have been answered, if everything checks out, the officer will send you on your way. However, if the officer suspects that you have been drinking, they will ask you to pull over to the side where another officer will perform a more thorough investigation. If it is determined that you have been drinking, then you will be arrested for DUI.


Driving while under the influence of any substance is never a good idea. Substances like alcohol affect a person’s abilities to make good decisions and their control over their motor skills.


Getting behind the wheel of a vehicle while drunk endangers the driver’s life, as well as the lives of every person that they pass on the road. DUI checkpoints help catch drunk drivers before they have a chance to hurt anyone, thereby making the roads safer for everyone around any day where people will be consuming more alcohol than usual.

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Drive High, Get a DUI

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2018 is bringing a lot of new changes to California laws. One of the biggest is that licensed dispensaries will be able to sell marijuana to anyone who is over the age of 21. This new law will make it easier for individuals to get ahold of marijuana, which will likely lead to more people using this. Unfortunately, this can include drivers.


A person should never get behind the wheel of a vehicle when they are under the influence of any kind of substance.


Doing so can negatively affect their ability to safely drive a vehicle, and lead to an accident. This is why the California Highway Patrol (CHP) has started a new campaign: Drive high, get a DUI.

This new campaign is to remind everyone that it is illegal to drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. This includes driving while high on marijuana. Being high can impair a person’s motor skills and reaction times. This makes them more likely to get into an accident than drivers who do no smoke marijuana.

In an effort to keep the roads safe, the CHP will pull over anyone who they suspect is driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. If a person wishes to avoid this, then they need to be safe while driving. This means they should not drink alcohol, or ingest marijuana, before getting behind the wheel of a motor vehicle.

Partying-too-Hard

Partying too Hard

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The official countdown to the New Year hasn’t started just quite yet, but your party planning for the New Year may have. Whether you plan on staying in, or going out, plan your New Year’s celebration wisely. This is the time of year where DUI checkpoints are around every corner, so don’t drive drunk, and remember your driver’s license.

On top of being responsible, try to be kind to your body as well. PreventionLane.org has several tips on how to be safe when consuming alcohol. The first tip is to know your limit, and stick to it. Consuming too much alcohol can land you or a loved one in the emergency room with alcohol poisoning. When consuming high amounts of alcohol it is wise to keep your body hydrated with water and eat a well-balanced meal beforehand.

Prevention Lane also recommends slowing down and sipping your drinks. Along with sipping your drinks, it is also suggested that you alternate between alcohol and water. While you’re alternating between water and your drink, also try to space out the drinks. The faster you consume your drinks, the faster you will become intoxicated.


Most importantly, have a designated driver and friend. The more you drink the lower your ambitions and cognitive abilities get. Having a friend to help guide you and make safe decisions, can help you have a successful New Year Party.


More Checkpoints Around Holidays

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DUI checkpoints can be intimidating to people, even when they have done nothing wrong. When it comes to DUI checkpoints, the only people who need to worry, are the ones who were drinking before they got behind the wheel of their vehicle. These checkpoints increase in frequency around holidays, especially ones that involve a lot of partying.

The police know that people tend to drink more around holidays. This leads to an increase in drunk driving incidents. That is why the police set up more DUI checkpoints around holidays like Christmas and New Year’s. The goal is to save lives by reducing the amount drunk driving incidents that can occur.

When a person comes across a checkpoint, they will likely encounter a line of cars. One by one, a team of officers will each call forward a vehicle to interview the driver. The officers will ask where the driver is headed, where they came from, and have they been drinking. They will also ask to see the driver’s license and registration.

So long as the driver cooperates, and the officer does not suspect that the driver has been drinking, the driver will be able to go on their way. However, if the officer does suspect that the driver has been drinking, then the driver will be asked to pull over to the side. From there, another officer will likely issue a field sobriety test. If the driver fails this, he or she will be held until they sober up, or someone comes to pick them up.


DUI checkpoints are nothing to be afraid of. They are only meant to catch drunk drivers. These checkpoints catch hundreds of drunk drivers, and keep the streets safe for everyone on the road.


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Halloween and DUI Checkpoints

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Halloween is a time for fun and games. For kids, this means trick or treating. For adults, this means parties, which will typically involve alcohol. The police and other local law enforcement are aware of this fact. They know people will be drinking during Halloween, and some of those people will think that getting behind the wheel of a vehicle is a good idea.

Drinking and driving is a bad enough idea on any day of the year, but it is especially dangerous on Halloween. This is due to the fact that there will be hundreds of kids roaming the streets trick or treating. This can increase the odds of someone getting hurt due to drunk driving.


In order to prevent as many accidents as possible from happening, local police will be setting up DUI checkpoints. They may seem like a nuisance, but they are there to keep people safe.


At a typical DUI checkpoint, the road will be restricted, and officers will be stopping vehicles to speak with the drivers. In most instances, the officer will simply ask for the driver’s name, and where the driver is coming from and going to. As long as the officer does not see any obvious signs of intoxication, the driver will be allowed to go on his way.

However, if the officer suspects that the driver is under the influence of drugs or alcohol, the driver will be asked to pull over to the side of the road. There, another officer will have the driver conduct a field sobriety test. If the driver fails this, than he or she will be taken into custody.

Drunk drivers cause hundreds of injuries, and roughly 36 deaths a day. Those numbers tend to grow around drinking holidays, which is why officers setup DUI Checkpoints. These checkpoints help keep the roadways safe for everyone out there. So, if you plan on going out and having something to drink this Halloween, be sure to do so responsibly. Assign a designated driver, or get a taxi, Lyft, or Uber. Doing this will help make sure everyone gets home safely.

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DUI Checkpoints in California

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If you did a lot of driving over the Labor Day weekend, it is likely that you encountered a DUI checkpoint at some point. It might have been a bit bothersome, since the checkpoint probably backed up traffic slightly, but it was for a good reason. The point of DUI checkpoints is to identify drivers who are under the influence and get them off of the road.

This becomes very important over 3 day weekends, since they tend to involve a lot of partying and drinking. This can lead to a sharp rise in drunk driving for that weekend. Law enforcement officers know this, which is why they set up checkpoints in an effort to reduce the number of accidents caused by drunk drivers.

Checkpoint locations will be posted ahead of time, usually online or in the local paper. As a citizen, you have the right to know this and plan a route that avoids any checkpoints.

If you decide to go through a checkpoint, or you simply did not know it was there, do not worry. Not every car gets stopped, and even if an officer stops you, there is nothing to worry about. Usually, the officer will ask to see your license and registration, before asking you a few quick questions. Unless they find reason to believe that you have been drinking, such as slurred speech or the smell of alcohol on your breath, they will let you go on your way. If they do believe that you have been drinking, they will ask that you pull over to the side and they will treat you like a typical DUI stop.


The ultimate goal of these checkpoints is to reduce accidents caused by drunk drivers. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, DUI checkpoints have the ability to stop 1 in 10 deaths caused by DUI related accidents.


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DUIs are No Joke in California

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Instead of treating the gang to a final round of shots at last call, treat them to a pitcher of water and some fast food. This will jumpstart the mind and body to sober up so you can all get home safe and sound. It is the responsible thing to do and although your buds may give you the thumbs down to denying alcohol, they will definitely give you the thumbs up for feeding them.

Consider the benefits of having one less drink. You save money, for one. Secondly, you have a little more awareness. Rather than driving home yourself, hop into a Lyft or Uber so that you can rely on this sober driver to get you home safely. While this will cost you a few bucks, at least you do not have to worry about accidents and DUIs.


A first offense DUI in California can be at least $40-50,000. This cost covers revoked licenses, attending a mandatory driving education course, the fees for getting your vehicle towed and impounded, and increased car insurance premiums for the next few years.


However that figure does not include hospital/ medical fees, property damages, and repairs. It also does not cover legal fees should you be taken to court. Repeat DUI offenders will consequently face harsher costs.

Of course, loss of money is not the worst thing to risk when a person drives intoxicated. The worst thing they risk is their life and the lives of others, which is anyone out on the road at the same time. Getting into a fatal accident is something that would haunt this person forever.

So, if you cannot rely on your friends to be the responsible ones, then you need to be the responsible one and know when it is time to stop drinking, and how to get everyone home safely.