Posts

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

A Breathalyzer for Drug Use?

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Recently, Californians voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in the state. When the legislation takes full effect next year, law enforcement officers will need a way to determine whether or not someone is driving while drugged.


They have breathalyzers for determining if someone is driving drunk, but no method that will currently hold up in court.


This is why 3 California county police departments have begun testing a new method for determining if someone has drugs in their system. The new system could allow officers to get a result, while at a traffic stop, in as little as 5 minutes. All the officer has to do is take a cheek swab of the individual, and then place that swab into a device the size of a walkie-talkie. The device then test for 6 different drugs.

The difficulty arises in the fact that drug affect individuals differently. On top of that, there is no current regulation for level of drug intoxication like there is for alcohol intoxication. With alcohol, having a blood alcohol level of 0.08% is considered drunk driving, but that does not currently exist for drugs.

The technology and research for all of this is still on going, and will continue to advance. The same can be said for laws regarding drug use. Until things become a little more permanent and concrete, it is best to apply drinking laws to the use of marijuana. This means do not drive under the influence, and do not become a public nuisance.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

If You File a False Report, You Will go to Jail

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

It is a crime to falsely report a crime. That is, you can and will get in trouble with the law if you report a crime but know that it really is not a crime. This is exactly what happened to a Los Angeles woman who, just a few weeks ago, was charged for her false report. Now she will have to pay her consequences by spending 2 months in jail.

26-year-old Charline Gatson filed a report with the police, reporting that an acquaintance approached her in her car and pulled out a gun. The acquaintance let Gatson go, but took her car. Gatson’s teenage son was still in the car, and the acquaintance drove off. The vehicle was found later in San Bernardino.

After investigators completed their work, they determined that Gatson’s carjacking and kidnapping report was false. In fact, Gatson had lent her vehicle to the acquaintance, and the acquaintance refused to return it. The stepson was not involved with the incident.

Because of Gatson’s false report, which effectively wasted resources, time, and money from police officers and investigators, Gatson was charged and ordered to spend 2 months in jail. In addition, she will be on probation for 36 months, and will pay a fine of $220.


Consequences for filing false reports are taken seriously because it takes officers away when they should be devoted to focusing on real, serious crimes.


All in all, filing false reports is irresponsible and reckless. It is, however, a different story when the person filing a report genuinely believes it to be true crime, but it is later determined that they are just mistaken. An example of that would be if someone witnessed a person whom they have never seen before, entering their neighbor’s apartment. Believing it to be an intruder, they alert the police. After investigating, the police learn that the neighbor had given this “intruder” their key because they are staying with them; this is an out-of-town friend, which is why the person had never seen them before.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

What Documentation Do You Need?

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

So few people have any knowledge about bailing a person out of jail with a bail bond, and that is understandable. Most people believe that they will never need to bail someone out of jail. For some, they are right, however, not everyone is that lucky.

Many people who are attempting to bail their loved one out of jail are surprised to learn that they need to have certain documents ready to go when they talk to their bail agent. These documents are very important to the bail bond process.

Here is what you will need to have ready when you talk to your bail agent.

  • Official ID – You will need to prove you are who you say you are with some form of official ID, such as a driver’s license. This lets the bail bond company know exactly who they are working with.
  • Proof of Residence – Next, you will need to prove that you do actually live in the state of California. This can be done with a utility bill.
  • Proof of Income – Finally, you will need to prove that you can afford to bail out your loved one. This can be done by showing your bail agent your paycheck stub or a bank statement.

That’s all the paperwork you need to get a bail bond. When you meet with your agent to sign paperwork, be sure to have all of this with you. By being prepared like that, you can shorten the bail process. By doing that, you shorten how much time your loved one has to spend behind bars.


If you have any questions, feel free to talk to one of our agents by clicking Chat With Us or calling 1-800-793-2245.


call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

It is Illegal to Misuse 9-1-1

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

When there is an emergency that requires immediate professional attention and care, the number to dial is 911. Emergencies include reporting a fire, or a car accident. Basically anything where fire, police, or medical attention is needed in order to save a life, reduce damaged property, catch a criminal, or rescue someone.

Emergencies do not include a restaurant running out of the barbecue sauce you wanted, really disliking your neighbor because they play loud music all the time, or not knowing how to unclog your toilet. There are certain times when calling 911 is and is not warranted for an incident.


In every state, including California, it is illegal to dial 911 if it is not an emergency. A person who abuses the hotline can be charged with an infraction and fined. They can even put into jail.


To provide some perspective, a person can be fined up to $1,000 and put into jail for up to 6 months if they repeatedly call 911 with the intent to annoy or harass another person, such as a neighbor they strongly dislike. For other instances where 911 is dialed for non-emergency related incidences, the person can be fined as much as $200 per dial.

Misusing 911 ties up the call center’s hotlines. This means that people who are calling for a true emergency must wait even longer to get the assistance they need immediately. Additionally, the more times a single individual dials 911, the longer others have to wait. That amounts to crucial seconds and minutes lost for those who really need emergency services.

You need to use your best judgement to know when to dial 911. If you are unsure, it is best to call 911 anyway, just in case. Before dispatching the police, an ambulance, or the fire department, they will ask you a few questions in regards to the situation to help them assess and evaluate the need for assistance. Then, they will quickly dispatch emergency services. Other times, the matter can be resolved right then and there with them guiding you over the phone or explaining, for the future, what would or would not be an emergency call. They are careful when explaining this since they do not want to discourage people from ever calling 911 again.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Is it Worth Fighting a Traffic Ticket?

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

When you get a traffic ticket for speeding or running a stop sign, you can easily pay it, but you wonder whether it is worth fighting the ticket. You might be able to get it reduced or thrown out altogether. In some cases, it can be worth it to fight. However, it is not always the easiest or fastest thing to deal with. In the long run, you may end up losing more money on wasted time. Before you decide, evaluate the pros and cons, including how disruptive it could be to your daily routine and how much you have to gain or lose financially. You need to look at not only your ticket, but your insurance premiums that could increase due to the ticket.


You can get out of paying for a traffic ticket if you show up for court, but the officer does not. This results in an automatic win for you because you are being denied the right to question your accuser.


If you postpone your court date and even choose one close to the holidays, you could be increasing your chances on having a no-show from the officer. Officers tend to schedule all their court appearances on the same days so they can do them all at once. If you can get the date moved, you could be in luck. If you get a date close to a major holiday, there is a chance the officer is off on vacation. The officer also may not show up for court if your ticket is inexpensive and is for a very low-level incident.

If you get a ticket based on camera footage, the ticket can get dismissed if the court does not have the video or picture. The courthouse may not want to go through the trouble of acquiring that video footage which means you win and do not have to pay the ticket.

There are other ways to fight a ticket, like getting a lawyer who specializes in traffic cases, but the ones mentioned here are the easiest, fastest, and most affordable ways to get out of paying for the ticket. These depend on your luck, but there could be a chance that luck is on your side.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Stunts Gone Wrong

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

The rise of YouTube has created several celebrities on the web. The site has made it possible for ordinary people to create their own fame. This has led to hundreds of thousands of people trying to climb their way to the top. Some of these people, attempt to do crazy or insane stunts to gain a following and get views.

More often than not, these stunts end in disaster. Someone ends up getting hurt, or worse, because the performer fails to do the stunt safely. They try to do the stunt right away, without any sort of rehearsal or testing.

Recently, a Minnesota woman accidentally shot her boyfriend while trying to film a stunt for a YouTube video. The plan was for her to shoot a .50 caliber Desert Eagle at a book that her boyfriend was holding in front of his chest. The thought was the book would stop the bullet. Unfortunately, that was not the end result. The woman now faces second-degree manslaughter charges and could face 10 years in prison.


The lesson here, is to not do something dangerous or life threatening just to gain popularity. It is not worth hurting yourself, or someone else. The consequences for messing up, can be far worse than you even realize.


call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

What Appears on Background Checks?

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Your skills qualify you for the job you are interviewing for and you hit it off with your interviewer. They tell you that unofficially, you have the job. They just need to do a background check and get the paperwork in order. Once everything clears, you are hired! However, you are worried that your potential employer will discover something on your background check that will put you in jeopardy of getting the position.

Background checks are standard procedure for job positions. They are also standard for other needs, like trying to get a home or an apartment. They are legal to do so long as the company complies with the federal and state laws on conducting background checks. The employer just wants to know if you have once been arrested for a crime.


When they conduct the background check, misdemeanors and felonies that have occurred in the last 7 years will show up. Infractions and any crimes that you were charged for that occurred over 7 years ago will not show up on your background check.


Additionally, if you received a pardon on a conviction, then that conviction will not show up on a background check. Sealed and expunged records will also not appear on background checks. Finally, if you had successfully completed a diversion program because of an arrest, then that arrest does not show up on your record either.

The chances of the employer denying you a job purely because of your criminal record is slim. If you are worried, you can discuss your concerns, but only if the employer brings up the topic.

Having a criminal history is not going hold you back from getting a job or home. Do not stress about that. If anything, it proves you dealt with something big and you managed to get through it professionally and maturely. That is a positive way to look at it, and hopefully your potential employers will think the same as well.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

No More Suspended Licenses for Californians

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Normally, when a driver amounts enough unpaid traffic and parking tickets, a judge will suspend that person’s license. If this person continues to drive while their license is suspended and has a run in with any law enforcement, he or she will be in big trouble. Driving on a suspended license can carry some hefty penalties. The severity of the penalty varies depending on the reasons for the suspension, but usually includes paying fines and possible jail time.


However, that is all about to change in California, at least for some people. Starting in August, California drivers will no longer face a suspended license for failing to pay traffic and parking tickets.


This new law was championed by Senator Bob Hertzberg and Governor Jerry Brown. After a little bit of research, Governor Brown determined that the punishment of the suspended license does not help the state collect unpaid fines. He goes on to argue that the punishment only worsens the load on low-income families by preventing the person from being able to go to their job. The idea of the law is to prevent the state from punishing someone for being poor.

While this new law will prevent judges from suspending a driver’s license for too many unpaid parking or traffic tickets, it will not completely remove suspended licenses. Judges will still be able to suspend a person’s license for failing to appear to court and other reasons as well.

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Can You Leave Your Child Unattended in the Car?

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

We made it through our first big heat wave, so you can rejoice about that. Unfortunately, this is only the beginning and you should brace yourself. You can count on there being more scorching days this summer. Remember to stay extra hydrated by drinking plenty of water and to put on sunblock when you spend any time outside. When you are driving someone in your car, especially your own young children, remember to open windows or turn the AC on. If you have to make a stop, do not leave them in the car alone. Not only is this illegal depending on the child’s age, it is also very dangerous in hot weather.

Vehicles heat up within minutes on hot days. If you think the weather outside is bad, the temperature inside the car is even worse. If you have a young child with you and you need to make a pit stop, bring them with you. It is illegal to leave a child who is 6 years old or younger unattended in a car unless they are supervised by someone who is at least 12 years old. However, even if your child is old enough to legally be left alone in the vehicle, you need to consider if they feel comfortable being left alone, the safety of the surrounding area, and how hot it is outside.

There are a number of consequences the driver can face for leaving their child unattended in a hot vehicle. These consequences include, but are not limited to, fines, jail time, being inspected by social services for child endangerment, and the loss of the child.


Whether it is over 100 degrees or 70 degrees, think of the safety of your child first. Although you may take a few minutes longer during your pit stop, taking them in with you is the safest and most responsible way to handle the situation.


call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

Finding Parking in Los Angeles Could Get Worse

call-san-bernardino-bailbonds

A parkway refers to the narrow strip of land that occupies the space between sidewalks and the curb. Parkways run parallel to the street and sidewalk and are landscaped, although many do not appear so because people have parked their cars on these areas over the years. In Los Angeles, officials have turned a blind eye to drivers who park their cars on parkways, but that may soon change.

Finding parking is a challenge in any major metropolis, and Los Angeles is no exception. In neighborhoods that are densely populated, residents slowly started to leave their vehicles in these parkway areas. Realizing they were never getting ticketed or towed, they continued to claim these as regular parking spots, and others in the area started to catch on to this trend. What they did not know was that the city actually agreed to be lenient on these individuals back in 2011, but they never made a formal announcement. Angelenos figured it out for themselves.


A few weeks ago, the Los Angeles transportation committee proposed a law that would make parkway parking illegal once again. In fact, the proposed law even says that standing or stopping on the parkway would also be illegal.


Should the proposed law be approved, the city would first implement a grace period. During this time they would reach out to residents to warn them to stop parking in these locations because starting mid-August, they would begin issuing tickets and citations once again.

Even if the law passes, drivers will still be able to park on their own driveway apron, which is the paved section from the curb up to the driveway as long as their vehicle does not block the street or the sidewalk.