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More-Commonly-Misused-Words

More Commonly Misused Words

More-Commonly-Misused-Words

There are many words within the English that confuse even native speakers. Some of the words have just been misused for so long, that it is hard to remember their proper usage. Others are so similar to other words, that it can be hard for people to know which one they want at a given time.

Here is a brief sample of commonly misused words:

  • A lot vs. alot: This is one that can be seen a lot, and the difference is pretty easy to understand. A lot means either a plot of land, or a large group of something. Alot is not actually a word.
  • Factoid: Many people assume that a factoid is a small bit of information, but that is wrong. A factoid is actually false information that is presented as fact.
  • Its vs. it’s: Its is used to show possession, meaning that whatever it is, it owns the following object. It’s is a contraction between it and is, or it and has.
  • Literally: this one gets misused quite frequently. When something literally happens, it means that something actually happened in the real world. A person’s head cannot literally explode, nor can they literally die of embarrassment.
  • Lose vs. loose: When you do not win a game, you lose a game. When something is not tight, it is loose.
  • Than vs. then: Than is used for comparisons, such as you like this more than that. Then is used for time, such as first we will do this, then that.
  • To vs. two vs. too: You use to when you give something to someone. Two is the number 2. Too, means there is too much stuff, or that someone else will be coming along too.
  • Your vs. you’re: Your shows possession of something. When you own something, it is yours. You’re, is a contraction of you and are.

The English language has thousands of words within it, so it is only natural that some of the words get messed up from time to time. However, if a person wants to write or speak accurately, they need to have a good understanding of each word they are using, otherwise they can send the wrong message.


8-Commonly-Misused-Words

8 Commonly Misused Words

8-Commonly-Misused-Words

The English language has thousands and thousands of words within it. This is why it can take native English speakers years to even come close to mastering it. Due to this fact, there are several words within this language of ours that are misused on a daily basis. Some words have been misused for so long, that the wrong meaning has now become their actual meaning.

    1. Bemused: Many people think that a bemused person is someone who is amused, when it in fact means that the person is confused.
    2. Compelled: When a person is compelled to do something, many would assume the person simply feels like they should do that thing. However, it really means that the person is being forced to do something.
    3. Enormity: Some people, including past presidents, think that enormity means something really big, but it does not. It really means a great or extreme evil.
    4. Ironic: This is one that many people mess up. They think that something is ironic when it is a funny coincidence, but when something is truly ironic, it is something that was the opposite of what the person expected.
    5. Literally: This word gets misused all of the time. Often times, when it’s used, people are better off using figuratively. When something literally happens, it means that something actually happened as it was stated.
    6. Nauseous: This means to cause nausea, so when a person says they feel nauseous, they are actually saying that they fell like they cause other people to be sick. What they mean to say is that they feel nauseated.
    7. Peruse: Many people think that this means to skim over something, but it actually means to thoroughly look through and review.
    8. Redundant: If something is redundant, many people think that this means the thing is repetitive, which is wrong. If something is redundant, it is something that is unnecessary and can be removed.

For some of these words, it can be easy to see how the wrong use came about. Take redundant, for instance, some things that are repetitive could also be considered redundant. Luckily, for everyone’s egos, most people are not alone in making these kinds of mistakes with the English language.

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Commonly Misused Words

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The English language is filled with hundreds of thousands of words, with several hundreds of words coming from other languages. On top of the impossibly high number of words out there, the English language has hundreds of rules on how those words can be used and it can take a lifetime to learn all of those rules.

This has led to a huge list of words that are commonly misused.

  • Enormity – At first glance, one might assume that enormity has some relation to the word enormous, however, that is not entirely the case. Enormity actually refers to an evil or immoral act.
  • Instant – This one gets misused a lot nowadays, and mostly by companies trying to sell you something. It is used to say that something can happen quickly, which is close to correct, but not quite. When something happens in an instant, it happens that exact moment. For example, you can snap your fingers in an instant. You cannot cook rice in an instant.
  • Literally – This is a word that is frequently misused by people to hyperbolize or exaggerate an effect that something will have. When something literally happens, it actually happens. A person can literally dance for joy. A person cannot literally have steam coming out of their ears because they are angry.
  • Ultimate – The misuse of this word is not as well known, and can be surprising to a lot of people. Ultimate, originally meant the end, or last of a series. For instance, this definition is the ultimate in this list of misused words, meaning it comes at the end of the list.

The interesting thing to note about a many of these words, is that while they are no longer used as they were originally intended, they still have the “wrong” use of the word listed under their definitions in the dictionary. This just goes to show how fluid and changing language is. Some of these words have been misused for so long, that the wrong meaning has actually become a part of their meaning.