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stolen property and cell phones

Could Parents Face Jail Time for Taking Away Their Child’s Cellphone?

stolen property and cell phones

Pretty much every adult out there today, could tell you how if they didn’t behave well as a child, their favorite toy or item would get taken away until they cleaned up their act. It’s a parenting strategy that adults have been using for as long as anyone can remember. Doing this teaches a kid that their bad behavior will result in undesirable consequences.

In today’s modern world, the most prized device of teens is their smartphone, an object that was nonexistent just a few decades ago. Naturally, this has become the go to object to take away from a misbehaving teen. However, doing this can have some unexpected consequences, as one Michigan mother found out.

The mother in question took 15-year-old daughter’s phone away as punishment for getting in trouble at school. Sometime later, a deputy knocked on her door to arrest her for theft. As it turns out, the woman’s ex-husband, who had given the phone to the daughter, had reported the theft to the police. He conveniently neglected to inform the officers that the woman who took the phone was the girl’s mother.

The woman was arrested and was kept in a holding cell for two hours before posting a $200 dollar bail. Thankfully, the case was quickly dismissed when it went to court, and the prosecutors learned that the phone was, indeed, the daughter’s and not the ex-husband’s.

This is a pretty crazy story, and luckily most parents do not have to worry about facing jail time over taking their child’s phone away. As the legal guardian of a minor, parents have the right to do things like taking away phones.

how to stay safe on halloween

Making Halloween Safe and Fun

how to stay safe on halloween

The spookiest day of the year is creeping closer and closer. With Halloween right around the corner, many kids are preparing themselves for a sugary feast. Meanwhile, parents are doing everything that they can to keep this Halloween both fun, and safe. While Halloween is meant to be a scary holiday, it should be safe for kids.

Of course, there are the more obvious safety tips such as:

  • Plan a route in advance.
  • Stay on sidewalks.
  • Stay well-lit.
  • Check kids candy.

There are also tips about what kind of costumes should be used, such as:

  • Wear comfy shoes.
  • Avoid masks.
  • Avoid costumes that drag.
  • Use flexible props.

Doing these quick little things will help a parent keep their kids safe this Halloween, but what about making sure this holiday is fun as well?

Not every neighborhood is a good place to go trick or treating. Some may be too unsafe, while other may be too isolated. For instance, rural dirt roads do not lend themselves to good trick-or-treating. A parent may need to take a good look at the neighborhood where they live to determine if they want to trick-or-treat there, or go somewhere else.

Many towns and cities offer different trick-or-treating alternatives, such as events like trunk-or-treat. Doing a little bit of research can turn up some local events that might help make a child’s Halloween celebration truly spook-tacular!

handicap parking laws in california

Handicap Parking Laws

handicap parking laws in california

We all know the struggle of trying to find the perfect parking spot. During the summer months, it seems near impossible to find a good spot. The best spot are usually reserved for drivers with handicaps, and even then there are few of the spots still. It may be tempting to just park in a handicap sot for a moment while you go run inside to pick a few things up from the grocery store. However, unless you have a placard, it is best not to do that.

Parking your vehicle in the handicap zone will hurt you finically. You can end up with a hefty fine. The act of misusing a handicap placard is illegal under the California Vehicle Code. By taking a handicap spot when you’re not permitted to, you’re taking it away from someone who may really need it. While you may not want to walk through the parking lot on a hot summer day, they truly can’t. You have the ability to walk that far, they don’t.

In order to get a handicap placard you must have a doctor’s referral. It’s also important to remember that not everybody’s disability is a physical. People can receive a handicap placard for poor vision, or they can be taking medication that may impair their driving ability. Not all diseases, or disabilities are visible to the human eye.

The driver may not be the one who is handicapped, but the passenger might be. Drivers of the legally blind have handicap placards for their passenger’s safety. After all, it wouldn’t be wise to have a person walking too far through a parking lot. The handicap parking spots are located close to the door for a reason. They are also wider, and have areas marked off for a safety reasons as well. This is why you can be ticketed for parking on the line of a handicap parking spot. These spaces exist for a reason.

California has been cracking down on handicap placard use. People have been miss using and taking advantage of the handicap placards for a while now. Not only that, people are parking in handicaps spots when they aren’t even handicapped. It’s been widely reported that 1 in 10 Californian drivers have a handicap placard. That is a lot of Californians that need that perfect spot. You may gripe and groan that you have to park further away, but think about how lucky you are to be able to walk that far.

Dog-Bite-Laws-in-California

Dog Bite Laws in California

Dog-Bite-Laws-in-California

Nobody likes to get hurt, especially when someone else could have and should have taken measures to prevent the incident from happening. On such kind of incident is dog bites. There is not a single person alive who would want to get bitten by a dog.

The state of California has strict liability laws when it comes to dog bites. What this means is, in most instances, the dog owner is liable if their dog bites someone. This means that the person who was bit has the right to seek legal compensation from the animal’s owner.

Some states limit when a dog owner is liable for their dog biting someone. For instance, some states only hold the owner liable if the dog has proven to be violent or vicious in the past. However, that is not the case in the state of California. Regardless of whether or not the dog has bitten someone in the past, the owner is still liable for anyone their dog injures by biting. The only time a person is not liable for their dog biting someone is if the person who was bit was trespassing on the owner’s private property.


Due to this fact, it is important for dog owners to keep their pets safe in their home or yard. If the dog gets out and bites someone, that person has the legal right to seek legal compensation from the dog’s owner.


police searches

Should Body Cam Footage Be Released to the Public

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Excessive force and authority is a constant topic in today’s news. This alongside the discussion of officer’s wearing and using body cameras that will provide additional evidence in the most critical and high profile cases. Most notably, incidents that result in the officer killing the person they pulled over or stopped on the street. There has been public outcry for such incidents, with the public demanding justice and the footage of police body cameras. Well, California could be one step closer to that.

A bill was introduced earlier this month that would make police body camera footage view-able to the public if it is considered to be of public interest. This would be incidents where police force is used, or when there are political protests that turn violent. There is a level of distrust between the public and the law in many communities where the people do not feel protected by those who are sworn to protect them. The bill aims to change that.

Currently in California, there is no statewide rule that says all police officers must wear and use body cameras. There is also no statewide rule that says footage can or cannot be released to the public. Instead, it is up to local law enforcement decision. Many police departments now require their officers to wear body cameras; others are testing them out. Body cameras are becoming more routine with departments. Although this has gained some traction, the accessibility of the footage is still the part that is mostly up in the air. Some departments do release footage to the public, but others do not.

Other states are also in the same boat as California, trying to figure out the best solution to remedy the relationship between the public and the police when it comes to these high profile cases of police brutality and force.


The California bill, introduced by a Bay Area assemblyman, will need to clear both houses of the Legislature before mid-September.