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facial recognition san bernadino bail bonds

Could Banning Facial Recognition Become the New Norm?

facial recognition ban

Today’s modern world has a lot of technology that a one point had simply been considered science fiction. Things such as earbuds, video calls, and mobile phones were just cool, out of this world ideas when they were first depicted in books and movies. Nowadays, they are a part of everyday life for most individuals. While many of these things are welcomed with open arms, some technologies are a bit invasive.

One such example of invasive tech would be facial recognition. With cameras everywhere, law enforcement agencies are able to use this kind of technology to locate people of interest in cases and bring them into justice. However, these electronic eyes are always watching, and this causes some concern amongst some people. That is why one US city is considering banning the use of this technology, or at the very least, limiting its uses.

San Francisco May Be the First to Ban Facial Recognition

The city of San Francisco is no stranger when it comes to creating new laws in uncharted territory. The city has been doing this for years now, and is currently considering a ban on facial recognition technology due to its invasive nature. The current proposed law would prohibit the San Francisco police from using the software, but not affect businesses or people from using the software. It also would not prevent the software from being used at San Francisco International Airport or the Port of San Francisco.

While Facial recognition technology is an incredibly helpful tool, especially for law enforcement agencies, it is also very invasive. Essentially, any camera out there in the world can be used to locate a single person. This is very helpful for manhunts, but can be dangerous if used by people with less than honest intentions. According to the New York Times, there is a fifty percent chance that a person’s face is already in a law enforcement’s database by the time they reach adulthood.

Another problem comes from a recent study published by MIT Media Lab. The study found that the facial recognition software tended to make mistakes with identifying a person’s gender if they were female or had darker skin.

It is the possible invasion of privacy and large room for error that gives some people cause for concern. However, while some people are against the technology, they do recognize its practical uses. This leads to some people supporting some sort of limitations on the technology, instead of an outright ban. This way, it can be used as needed, or allowed to come back once the tech has a better success rate.

What This Could Mean for the Rest of the Country

Other cities and states, such as nearby Oakland and even Massachusetts, have also considered placing bans on facial recognition technology. It is safe to assume that they, along with other locations, will be paying close attention to San Francisco. Depending on how things go there, they may copy the ban or make alterations to better suite their needs or beliefs.

There is no denying that facial recognition software has many benefits, especially in the law enforcement field. The technology can help officers locate wanted criminals, or track down missing children. This is a very powerful tool. However, its strength comes at the cost of privacy. This technology looks at everyone, whether they want it to or not, and once they are in the facial recognition database, they likely aren’t getting out of it, if they ever even realize that they are there. That is what scares some people, and causes them to look for some sort of restrictions on the technology.

What do you think of facial recognition software? Is it a helpful tool for police officers, or is it too invasive to a person’s privacy? Is San Francisco right in the idea that the tech should be outright banned, or should they do something a little less permanent? Should other cities and states follow suite? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

public pool health issues san bernardino bail bonds

People Do What Before Getting Into Public Pools?

public pool health issues

With the weather quickly heating up, many people are starting to pull their swimsuits out from their winter hiding spots. With California’s thousands of miles of coastline, there are plenty of places to go to the beach. However, the beach isn’t for everyone. Some people prefer to cool off without having to worry about sand getting everywhere. That is why some people prefer going to a pool.

In addition to the lack of sand at pools, they are often cleaner as well. The water is maintained by humans, instead of being left alone. However, despite the chemicals, mostly chlorine, put into pool water to keep it clean, one recent survey found that pools aren’t always as clean as one would hope.

Public Pools May Not be as Clean as You Think

The clear blue water of pools often looks a heck of a lot cleaner than ocean, lake, or river water. Those waters typically have all kinds of debris floating beneath the surface, making them hazy. Pools lack this haze due to the chemicals put into them to kill bacteria, and the filtration systems in them to pick out the bigger particles like bugs and leaves.

However, despite all of that, pools can still contain bits of harmful bacteria, bacteria that is typically brought in by swimmers. A recent survey conducted by Water Quality and Health Council found that 51% of Americans used pools as a way to rinse off after performing sweat inducing activities.

The survey, which polled 3,100 American adults and had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.7%, also found the following information:

  • 24% of people would go within a pool within an hour of having diarrhea.
  • 40% of adults peed in pools.
  • 48% admitted to not showering before entering a pool.
  • 53% didn’t know makeup affected the chemistry of the pool.
  • 55% didn’t know deodorant affected the chemistry of the pool.
  • 64% acknowledge the fact that pools don’t eliminate the need to shower, but use pools as a reason not to shower anyways.

While chlorine does help keep pools cleaner, it isn’t an infinite source of cleanliness. Think of the chlorine in a pool like a bar of soap. Every time it is used to clean something, it becomes smaller and less effective until it is all used up. However, chlorine is not a replacement for soap.

Chlorine keeps pools clean by causing chemical reactions in the water that kill microorganisms and bacteria. By adding other chemicals to the mix, bodily fluids, makeup, and deodorant, a person reduces the strength of the chlorine in the water, thereby reducing its effectiveness.

Help Keep Public Pools Clean

Some of the findings in this survey are more than a bit disgusting. Hopefully, they will serve as a reminder to everyone that there are times when they shouldn’t go swimming, and more than that, they should shower before getting into a pool. Doing so can help keep the water cleaner, longer.

Pools are a great way to beat the summer heat, and most are likely maintained on a regular basis. So long as a pool’s owner keeps up with the maintenance of the pool, its filter system, and the chemical makeup, there is no reason to not go swimming in it. All public pools in California are required by law to be kept at safe and sanitary levels at all times. If a person suspects that this isn’t being done at a local public pool, they can report the problem to their local health officials.

As things begin to heat up this summer, be sure to help keep pools clean by not using them as bath time, and showering before getting into the water. This will help keep the pool water clean for everyone.