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Can a Parent Give their Child Alcohol?

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Like all states, the minimum age for drinking alcohol in California is 21. However, unlike other states, there are no exceptions to this rule in California. For example, some states allow minors to drink alcohol under the allowance and supervision of their parent or legal guardian, but this is not allowed in California.

In California, minors who violate the legal age drinking laws for the first time face a $250 fine and 24-32 hours of community service. For subsequent violations, the minor is looking at a fine of $500 maximum and 36 to 48 hours of community service. If they have their driver’s license, it can be suspended for 1 year.


call-sanbernardinobailbondsAny individual who is caught providing the minor with alcohol faces a $1,000 fine and 24 hours of community service. This applies to California parents who give alcohol to their own children.


Retail businesses who are caught selling alcohol to minors will have to pay a $1,000 fine and the vendor can potentially go to county jail for anywhere from 6 months to 1 year. These consequences also apply to an adult, like a parent, if the minor consumes alcohol and then causes serious injury or death to themselves or another.

So, California parents, even if you give only one, low-alcohol content cocktail to your 20 year old, and they drink it in your presence and show the alcohol does not affect their judgment and maturity, you are still committing a crime, and so is your child. Just look forward to the 21st birthday, okay?

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Is There a Legal Obligation to Report a Crime as a Witness?

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There was a recent incident involving rape, Facebook, and what did or did not happen after the fact. An adolescent Chicago girl was raped by 5 or 6 males and the incident was streamed live on Facebook long enough for nearly 50 people to watch and know what was going on. None of those nearly 50 people reported the assault to the police. So, besides the males who attacked the girl, do those 50 or so people also get in trouble for witnessing it, but not speaking up? Here is a closer look at what the laws say about bystanders who become witnesses to crimes.

In the United States, if a person is a witness to a crime, they likely have no legal obligation to report it to the police. There are groups of people though who are required to report certain crimes, and it would be because of their profession.

For example, doctors, nurses, law enforcement, social workers, and teachers are required to report certain crimes, like abuse and neglect, to the police, even if they just suspect that it is occurring. If these people are required to report crimes but fail to do so, they can be charged a misdemeanor and face up to 6 months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

There may be no legal obligation to report a crime, but there may be a moral obligation to do so. This means that a person who witnesses a crime may report it because they believe it is the right thing to do. They may or may not know that they do not legally have to do it or that they will not get arrested for failing to reporting a crime. If they believe they should contact the police because what they witnessed was wrong and they want some type of justice, they will report it. This is their moral obligation.

When it comes to witnessing crimes online, there are complicating factors. For example, witnesses may not accurately assess what they saw online or what they saw online may be a fake or manipulated video. For California, the same law applies. Someone who witnesses a crime happening through an online channel is not required to report it, and they will not be arrested for failing to do so.

In either case, witnessing a crime in person or online, the police may still track witnesses down to question them. By this point, the police will know they did not report the crime, but they will not be arrested. The police just want to take down a statement of what the witness saw and heard.

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Fullerton Bail Bond Store Sheds Hope Too

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Having an arrest and criminal record is not the best thing to have, but it is not the worst thing either. Naturally, anyone would think getting arrested is the end of their life, but that is because they have not talked to us at Fullerton Bail Bond Store.

Half of what we do is provide affordable bail bonds and customized payment plans to get a defendant released from jail. The other half is instill hope in the defendants and their worried loved ones, hope that turns true. Life goes on, in the best of ways, after the arrest.

People who have criminal records still get jobs, find love, own homes, and live a wonderful, happy life. We are willing to bet that either you know someone who has a criminal record, or you have interacted with a stranger, who has a criminal record and you could not even tell. If you, or a loved one, are currently in the middle of this stressful situation, just wait it out with patience. Soon enough, you will find that it has all blown over and everything is pretty much back to normal again.

We genuinely hope you will never need our bail bond services but if you do, contact us anytime online, or at 866-736-6977 .

Drone Operator Charged With Crime – What To Know So It Doesn’t Happen To You

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Okay everyone, the LAPD means business when they say stop flying drones that interfere with police and firefighting work. You can get in real trouble for doing so, like Martin Shelton.

Last month, Shelton flew a drone near an LAPD helicopter (within only 50 feet) as it was searching for a suspect of a separate crime. He has been charged with “two counts of obstructing a peace officer in the lawful performance of his duties.” He faces up to 1 year in jail and $1,000 in fines.

Point in case: do not fly drones near helicopters or planes, even if they aren’t the police or fire department. Do not fly drones over private property unless you have permission to. Read up on the current legal fly zones for drones, do some research on the most recent debates on drones, and get familiar with potential changes to the laws.

If you or someone you know gets arrested for disobeying drone laws (or any other reason), contact Fullerton Bail Bond Store at 866-736-6977 .. You can also go to PennyBailBonds.com.